Land Arts accepting student applications for 2017

Informational Meeting:
February 17 at 2pm
Lannan Reading Room, 304b
Art building #84
University of New Mexico

Applications are due March 1, 2017
Application instructions: https://landarts.unm.edu/application.html
For more information contact, Assistant Professor, Jeanette Hart-Mann: hartmann@unm.edu

Land Arts of the American West (LAAW) is an interdisciplinary, field-based, Art & Ecology program for students at the University of New Mexico.
Fall Semester 2017
Full-time: 12 CR Undergraduate // 9 CR Graduate

As a collective, LAAW travels for up to six weeks exploring the ecology of place within the American Southwest. The rest of the semester is spent in intensive creative workshopping, in studio process, and in preparation for public exhibition. Students model a professional creative practice through highly independent, student-centered research, field investigation, creative production, and final presentation/dissemination. As a group, LAAW students also collaborate on a bioregional project.

Someone to Ride the River With

“Someone to ride the river with,” a saying used in the Western United States during the late 1800s, referred to a person who could be counted on, someone who was reliable. In the spirit of this adage, MFA photography students in the Southwest are banding together to form a network through which they can provide support and help one another to navigate the uncertain waters of academia and the art world.

2016 CFA Dean’s List

CFA Dean Kymberly Pinder is pleased to announce the Dean’s List after fall 2016. These students have achieved a semester grade point average of 3.50 or higher on 12 or more graded credit hours. This honor is listed on the students transcript. Congratulations CFA scholars!

Musicology Colloquium Series

This talk will examine the first zarzuela ever written, El laurel de Apolo (1658), by Calderón de la Barca. Though largely ignored by musicologists due to its lack of surviving music, Dr. Quinn will show that a focus on its soundscape reveals a critique of the governance of the Hapsburg Empire.